Top innovative shots in T-20 cricket by Mohd Asim
Events like IPL and Big bash league are big money making tournaments which attracts every cricketer

Cricket has gone through several modifications since its evolution but the last decade or so have seen the most advance version of the game. From being an equal contest between bat and ball cricket is now transformed into more sort of a batsmen game. Giant bats and shorter boundaries has changed the psychology of the bowlers, who now lay more emphasis on developing skills that can help them escape the bashing, rather than picking up wickets. Batsmen too in an attempt to counter the alteration in bowling strategies have developed several innovative shots that were hard to imagine a decade ago. The credit to such massive transformation much go to the youngest member of the cricketing format that is the T-20. Events like IPL and Big bash league are big money making tournaments which attracts every cricketer, who in turn to get himself on par with the requirements advances several inventive shots. Today we are going to discuss about such contemporary cricketing shots that are used to score quick runs in the shortest format of the game which only has 120 balls to set the tone.

Reverse Scoop

the South African batsman AB de Villiers who used it to good effect for scoring quick runs in the final stages of the game.

The shot was mastered by the South African batsman AB de Villiers who used it to good effect for scoring quick runs in the final stages of the game. Proper practice and execution is required to play the shot as even a minute error can result in the downfall of the batsman. The shot involves bending low and switching hands to reverse scoop the ball over the third man for a maximum. While most batsman are expertise in innovation, shot like these set De Villiers apart from the rest.

Dilscoop

who first played the shot in the ICC World T-20 in 2009.

The shot draws its name from Sri Lanka opener Tillakaratne Dilshan, who first played the shot in the ICC World T-20 in 2009. Originally known as the Dougie Marillier shot, the ramp or scoop, is one of the most effective shot to fetch some quick runs in the shortest format of the game. To effectively play a shot the batsman must bent down one knee and scoop the ball over the keepers head for a boundary. The shot is one of the safest to play as usually no fielders are placed behind the keeper.

Down the track slog

, who first played the shot in the ICC World T-20 in 2009.

The shot is the more advanced form of the orthodox slog where the batsman instead of slogging the ball from a stationary position goes down the track and hits the ball over deep mid-wicket for a maximum. Used to rattle the line and length of bowler, down the track slog requires fast hands as a mishit could get the batsman end up getting caught.

Reverse sweep

Used to rattle the line and length of bowler,

The shot requires a lot practice and is more often than not used to disturb the line and length of the bowlers. To play a reverse sweep batsman must bent down in low position with extending arms towards the ball and move his shoulder horizontally to pierce the ball somewhere between point and third man. The bowlers sometimes adopt a strategy to bowl on their legs with packed on side field and reverse sweep can be used to good effect to overcome the strategy. If played correctly it can ripe great benefits for the batsmen but could as well be reason for their downfall as ball could scoop in their leaving the batsman in danger of being caught.

Switch hit

batsman Kevin Pietersen first played it against Muttiah Muralitharan in a match against Sri Lanka in 2006.

The shot came into prominence when English batsman Kevin Pietersen first played it against Muttiah Muralitharan in a match against Sri Lanka in 2006. Since then the shot has been covered with controversies with some former cricketers terming it against the ethics against the game. To play a switch hit batsman needs to change his stance and grip from right to left hand just before the bowler bowls the delivery. Along with Pietersen, Australian opener David Warner is also known to be the master of the stroke.

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